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Costa Rica
Saturday, May 28, 2022
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Costa Rican Electricity Institute

Costa Rica explores using the ocean to generate electric power

The generation of maritime energy is technologically viable, but it is currently not very accessible from a financial point of view.

Costa Rica launches special credits for electric cars, taxis and buses

Each of the three state banks presented their loan proposals to boost electric transport and replace fossil-fueled vehicles.

Almost all of Costa Rica’s energy has come from renewable sources since 2014

Just 1.47 percent of Costa Rica’s electricity from June 1, 2014 to June 30, 2018 used fossil fuels.

Massive fire at San José power station leaves more than 100,000 buildings without electricity

UPDATE: June 29. 6:18 p.m. The National Power and Light Company (CNFL) and the Costa Rican Electricity Institute reported on Thursday evening that power had been restored to all customers at around 5:30 p.m.

Reduced electricity rates this year? Don’t hold your breath

ICE Executive President Carlos Obregón and CNFL General Manager Víctor Solís will have to appear before a Legislative Assembly committee to explain the impact of the agencies' investments on electricity rates.

Costa Rica prepared for this season’s harsh weather, energy officials say

The ICE noted that so far this year it has only turned to thermal plants as backup generation sources.

Lawmakers exclude full hybrids from electric cars bill

The bill proposes a series of tax incentives for promoting the purchase of new electric cars and plug-in hybrids, including the elimination of the sales, selective consumption and customs taxes.

Costa Rica to end year with mostly renewable electricity sources

Power generation using fossil fuels represents only 1.88 percent of Costa Rica's 2016 total, the Costa Rican Electricity Institute reported.

Electricity rates to go up starting July

The Public Services Regulatory Authority (ARESEP) announced Tuesday that electricity rates for all but one of the country's electricity providers will go up starting next month.

Reventazón, Central America’s biggest hydroelectric project, goes online

The first of the Reventazón dam’s five turbines went online this week. When the dam is fully operational, it will produce enough power for an estimated 525,000 homes.

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