The Tico Times | Costa Rica News | Travel | Real Estate https://ticotimes.net Costa Rica’s leading English-language newspaper since 1956, featuring breaking news, regional news, travel, business, sports, entertainment and real estate. Mon, 12 Apr 2021 20:28:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://ticotimes.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/cropped-Logo-32x32.png The Tico Times | Costa Rica News | Travel | Real Estate https://ticotimes.net 32 32 Businessman Guillermo Lasso wins Ecuadorian election, vows to change ‘destiny’ https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/12/businessman-guillermo-lasso-wins-ecuadorian-election-vows-to-change-destiny Mon, 12 Apr 2021 20:28:23 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144092 Lasso, 65, will inherit a pandemic-battered and debt-laden economy and a political system riven by gridlock when he takes over from the unpopular Lenin Moreno.

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Former banker Guillermo Lasso pledged to change crisis-wracked Ecuador’s “destiny” after overcoming leftist economist Andres Arauz in the country’s presidential election.

With 96.35% of votes counted by Monday morning, Lasso maintained a lead of almost five percentage points over Arauz, who conceded late on Sunday night.

Right-winger Lasso, 65, will inherit a pandemic-battered and debt-laden economy and a political system riven by gridlock when he takes over from the unpopular Lenin Moreno next month.

“On May 24 we will assume with responsibility the challenge of changing our country’s destiny and achieving for all Ecuador the opportunities and prosperity we all yearn for,” said Lasso, a seasoned politician who has finished second in presidential votes twice before.

Lasso, of the Creating Opportunities movement, faces a tough job during his four-year term with Arauz’s leftist Union of Hope coalition the largest party in parliament.

“There will be permanent tension with the executive. There’s almost no chance of the reforms the country needs,” said Pablo Romero, an analyst at Salesiana University.

Lasso must now juggle the need to boost an economy that shrunk by 7.8 percent in 2020, while managing the pandemic that has overwhelmed hospitals with more than 340,000 coronavirus infections and over 17,000 deaths.

He also faces overall debt of almost $64 billion — 63% of GDP — of which $45 billion is external debt.

‘Democratic convictions’

Arauz, best known as the protege of former president Rafael Correa, was magnanimous despite earlier claiming victory following a tight exit poll.

“I congratulate him on his electoral triumph today and I will show him our democratic convictions,” said Arauz.

Lasso, who later tweeted that he had received a call from Arauz, had 52.42 percent of the vote compared with Arauz’s 47.58 percent, the National Electoral Council said.

The former banker finished 13 percentage points behind Arauz in February’s first round of voting but stormed back to win the second round.

Twice before he had finished second: to Correa in 2013 and Moreno in 2017.

Lasso only scraped into the run-off by less than half a percentage point ahead of indigenous candidate Yaku Perez, who contested the result and claimed to have been the victim of fraud.

Speaking in his home city of Guayaquil — Ecuador’s economic motor — Lasso vowed to install a government of change “without leaving anyone behind.”

“Today we can sleep in peace and calm. I don’t arrive with a list of who I want to persecute or see in jail,” he said, in what seemed a thinly veiled barb at Arauz.

Prior to the election, Arauz had suggested he wanted to see Moreno charged with neglect over Ecuador’s pandemic management.

During Moreno’s mandate, Arauz’s mentor Correa was convicted of corruption and sentenced to eight years in jail, although he has yet to serve that as he lives in exile in Belgium.

“I want to see all Ecuadorans free, without fear of the government … expressing their opinions freely,” said Lasso.

‘Profound defeat’

The director-general of the Organization of American States, Luis Almagro, congratulated Lasso on the win, saying he hoped they could work together in “strengthening democracy, human rights, security and development.”

Both Uruguay President Luis Lacalle Pou and Luis Abinader, president of the Dominican Republic, said on Twitter they had called Lasso to offer their congratulations.

“I am sure that we are both going to work for the economic recovery of our peoples and the generation of jobs for our fellow citizens,” Abinader wrote.

Voting was obligatory for oil-rich Ecuador’s 13.1 million registered voters.

Arauz, 36, was a virtual unknown before topping February’s first round of voting on the back of support from Correa, who led the country from 2007 to 2017.

Many experts billed the election as a battle of “Correism versus anti-Correism” in a country bitterly divided along political lines.

Correa, whose influence on Ecuadoran politics remains strong, would have been Arauz’s running mate but for his corruption conviction.

Romero told AFP this was a “profound defeat” for Correa but by no means meant “the end of Correism.”

However, “it won’t have the same strength from now on. Correa will remain relegated and we will have to see who within Correism will be able to sustain this.”

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Costa Rica unemployment rate remains among world’s highest https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/12/costa-rica-unemployment-rate-remains-among-worlds-highest Mon, 12 Apr 2021 16:49:14 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144066 Unemployment in Costa Rica fell to 18.5% in the moving quarter from December to February, according to the National Institute of Statistics and Census (Inec).

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Unemployment in Costa Rica fell to 18.5% in the moving quarter from December to February, according to the National Institute of Statistics and Census (Inec). Per World Bank data, that figure would place Costa Rica among the nations with the highest unemployment rates.

Compared to the same quarter of last year, unemployment in Costa Rica has increased by 6.3 percentage points. Women have a higher unemployment rate than men — 25.0% and 14.1%, respectively.

INEC estimates the employed population at 1.99 million people, which represents a statistically significant reduction of 235,000 people compared to the same time last year.

“The internal composition of the labor force shows a decrease in the employed population and an increase in unemployed people,” INEC says.

Meanwhile, the INEC calculated the underemployment rate — the percentage of employed people who work fewer than 40 hours a week and want to work more hours — at 17.1%, a 5.3 p.p. year-over-year increase.

Unemployment in Costa Rica had reached 12% in March 2020, already one of the highest levels recorded in the country until then, but it soared to 24% due to the impact of the pandemic in the moving quarter from May to July 2020.

Since then, the unemployment rate has experienced a slow decline as the economy has reopened.

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International arrivals to Costa Rica down 83% in first two months of 2021 https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/12/international-arrivals-to-costa-rica-down-83-in-first-two-months-of-2021 Mon, 12 Apr 2021 15:35:19 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144063 International arrivals to Costa Rica dropped 83% in January and February 2021 compared to the same months last year. 

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International arrivals to Costa Rica dropped 83% in January and February 2021 compared to the same months last year.

According to official data from the Tourism Board (ICT), Costa Rica welcomed 117,450 people over the first two months of 2021. Last year, the country received 699,673 arrivals over the same span, which immediately preceded the coronavirus pandemic’s global travel impacts.

The majority of visitors to Costa Rica in 2021 are coming from the United States, per the ICT. Of the 117,450 arrivals, more than 60% (73,120 people) visited from the North American country.

France (5,265 people) is a distance second place, with Canada (5,016 people) in third.

Canada, which has imposed significant restrictions on international travel, has sent 94.4% fewer visitors to Costa Rica in 2021 compared to 2020. Tourism from the United States has declined 74.2% since early last year.

Still, there are some encouraging signs for the post-pandemic travel industry. In May, United Airlines will operate more flights to Latin America than it did in 2019. (This includes flights to Costa Rica from Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, New York City and San Francisco.)

That month, American Airlines will “unground” remaining planes and operate all of its aircraft for the first time since the pandemic started.

Tourism is one of Costa Rica’s principal economic drivers. Before the pandemic, it contributed to 8.2% of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) and created 9% of the nation’s jobs, according to the ICT.

While Costa Rica is welcoming tourists from anywhere in the world, measures related to the pandemic have complicated international travel. The United States, for example, continues to recommend avoiding travel “until you are fully vaccinated” and requires a negative Covid-19 test before returning on a flight from abroad.

Canada urged its airlines to suspend flights to “sun destinations,” including Costa Rica, and imposes a mandatory quarantine of 14 days at minimum.

Click here to see Costa Rica’s entry requirements during the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Top 5 risk factors for oral cancer https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/12/top-5-risk-factors-for-oral-cancer Mon, 12 Apr 2021 14:10:52 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144059 Are you at risk for oral cancer? Read this brief article about the top five factors that may put you at risk of oral cancer.

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When you visit the dentist in Costa Rica, you can feel confident that your dentist is looking for cavities, plaque build-up and other possible dental concerns often found during routine check-ups. What you may not have known is that dentists also use routine dental visits to check for cancer at the same time.

Almost every year, more than 50,000 U.S. citizens are diagnosed with oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue. These are dangerous, life-threatening cancers that can often be prevented.

Regular visits to your dentist can help you detect such cancers early. Changing a few potentially harmful habits may help reduce your chances of developing these deadly cancers.

Are you at risk for oral cancer? Read this brief article about the top five factors that may put you at risk of oral cancer.

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

The sexually transmitted disease is now associated with about 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer (specifically those occurring at the back of the tongue, in or around the tonsils) diagnosed each year in the United States. People who are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer tend to be younger and nonsmokers. People with HPV-positive cancers have a lower risk of death or recurrence, even though these cancers are often diagnosed at a later stage because it develops in difficult-to-detect areas.

Gender

Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer. The American Cancer Society attributes this to higher rates of alcohol and tobacco use by men. More men of a younger age are also being diagnosed with HPV-related forms of oral cancer. While men are more at risk, men who do not drink alcohol or use tobacco have reduced risk compared to women who drink alcohol and use tobacco products.

Age

Most people who are diagnosed with oral cancer are 55 or older, according to the American Cancer Society. HPV-related oral cancers, however, are often diagnosed in people who are younger. Alcohol and tobacco use often have cumulative effects over a lifetime, increasing one’s risk with every year of use.

Tobacco

Whether you smoke it or chew it, tobacco use increases your risk dramatically. Smoking can cause oral cancer, as well as cancer in other parts of the body. Pipe smokers are also at a higher risk for developing cancer in their lips. Smokeless tobacco, like chew, can lead to many issues in your mouth, the most serious being cancer of the cheeks, gums, and lips. In short, there is no safe form of tobacco.

Alcohol

According to the American Cancer Society, 7 of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers. Heavy drinking, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is an average of two drinks a day or more for men and an average of more than one drink a day for women. If you are a heavy drinker and a heavy smoker, your chances of developing oral cancer increase significantly.

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If you are concerned about your risk for oral cancer, please contact Goodness Dental for a low-cost general check-up and cleaning. During this procedure, our dentists will examine your mouth for any signs or oral cancer. It’s never too late to take better care of your mouth. Call Goodness Dental today at 866-406-2744 to learn more.

This story was sponsored by Goodness Dental.

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Who was Juan Santamaría? Five (debated) things you should know https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/12/who-was-juan-santamaria-five-debated-things-you-should-know-2021 Mon, 12 Apr 2021 11:03:33 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144055 Costa Rica feted its first and most-loved national hero, Juan Santamaría, on Sunday, April 11. 

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A version of this story first ran in 2015.

Costa Rica feted its first and most-loved national hero, Juan Santamaría, on Sunday, April 11. His name adorns the international airport in his native Alajuela, and schoolchildren across the country learn his story. But how much of that story is legit?

In the Battle of Rivas, Nicaragua, on April 11, 1856, the humble drummer boy set fire to a garrison lodging mercenary troops who sought to take control of Central America for the United States. His selfless act of bravery changed the course of the war and saved Costa Rica from becoming a slave depot.

Or so the legend goes.

As with most legends, people have debated the veracity of the details since shortly after the event took place. Costa Rica officially takes great pride in having made a working-class campesino its national hero rather than a military or political leader (Costa Rica claims to be the only Latin American country to have done so). However, some historians and sociologists say the original construction of the Juan Santamaría myth was, well, convenient.

In the second half of the 1800s, Costa Rican leaders were looking for something around which to form a national identity, and particularly something — or someone — that would engage the lower and middle classes and secure their loyalty.

That someone was Juan Santamaría.

Five things to know about Costa Rica’s national hero

1) A Panamanian started Juan Santamaría’s path to heroism.

The first time Juan Santamaría’s name was mentioned to a wide audience was in a speech and in pamphlets authored by Panamanian-Colombian politician José de Obaldía in 1864. (The two countries were several times united under the same flag.)

De Obaldía was exiled in Costa Rica at the time, and as part of the September 15 Independence Day activities that year, he delved into the details of the 1856 Battle of Rivas and wrote:

“Gentlemen, the humble hero…is named Juan Santamaría, known as Gallego. Honor his memory!”

The reference to Gallego is unclear, though Juan Santamaría’s mother may have had the last name Gallegos.

Despite de Obaldía’s prescience, the nation’s political leaders basically forgot about Santamaría until 1885, according to Costa Rican historian David Díaz Arias. That’s the year Guatemalan dictator Justo Rufino Barrios decided to revive the idea of uniting the isthmus in a single Federal Republic of Central America — by force, if necessary.

Costa Rican leaders decided Juan Santamaría was the perfect figure around which to consolidate a national identity they hoped citizens would fight to defend.

2) Juan Santamaría was mixed race.

Santamaría’s nickname was “El Erizo,” which could mean “burr” or “sea urchin” — he had curly hair, a testament to his partly African heritage.

But Costa Rican leaders at the time weren’t at all interested in emphasizing the country’s mixed heritage; they wanted the country to be seen as “white.”

Part of the politicos’ plan to elevate Juan Santamaría to hero status was to build a statue, the one that currently stands in Alajuela. They hired a French sculptor to craft it, and when it was unveiled, in 1891, Santamaría looked a lot like a French soldier.

Then, in 1897, Costa Rican painter Enrique Echandi Montero, threw a wrench in the hero’s identity. He painted a scene of Juan Santamaría’s legendary fire-setting deed, and in it he showed the hero as an exhausted-looking peasant with mulatto features.

The image was more of a “fallen hero,” along the lines of Jesus on the cross, than a determined warrior, wrote historian Guillermo Brenes Tencio.

The owner of the daily La República, Juan Vicente Quirós, did not like it. On Jan. 25, 1897, he wrote an article saying the painting was “worthy of the flames.”

He called the work “reproachable from an artistic point of view” and “a caricature that sacrilegiously makes fun of the hero and makes the entire country look sadly ridiculous.”

Look for a likeness of Juan Santamaría today and you’re likely to find one based on the French-made statue.

3) Juan Santamaría was actually the third person to try to set fire to the mercenaries’ garrison.

Santamaría was the guy who finished the job, not the one who started it. The first two to attempt to set fire to the garrison were a lieutenant from Cartago, who was wounded, and a Nicaraguan soldier, who died.

In a paper, Alejandra Murillo Goussen postulated that the first two wouldn’t have worked as national heroes: the lieutenant because he didn’t actually die for the cause, and the soldier because he wasn’t Costa Rican. That left Santamaría.

4) No one knows where Juan Santamaría is buried.

In 1981, then-Sandinista commander Daniel Ortega made a big show of meeting Costa Rican President Rodrigo Carazo Odio at the border to hand over the supposed remains of Juan Santamaría and other Costa Rican soldiers killed in the Battle of Rivas.

The story was that the remains of Juan Santamaría had been found buried underneath an atrium in Rivas in a box marked with the initials “JS,” historian Díaz Arias recounted in a 2014 article in La Nación.

Díaz suggests that politicians from both countries used the event to attempt to renew the symbolism of Juan versus foreign meddlers (ahem, the United States) and to turn Santamaría into a Central American hero, not just a Costa Rican one.

But some Costa Ricans were suspicious — both of the motives and of the contents of Santamaría’s supposed coffin.

They were right: several months later, a commission of Costa Rican scientists formed to evaluate the authenticity of the remains issued a report saying that the promised sacred bones weren’t even human.

5) Costa Rica’s reputation as the Switzerland of Central America may have started with Juan Santamaría.

You might think the whole Switzerland comparison is about Costa Rica’s political neutrality and relatively high standard of living. But here too, Santamaría might have a role.

In his scathing 1897 review of Enrique Echandi Montero’s painting of Santamaría, La República owner Quirós called the hero “the Guillermo Tell of our mountains.”

Guillermo (Wilhelm in German) Tell is a 14th century Swiss folk hero who was ordered by a tyrant to shoot an apple off his son’s head. Tell, as legend has it, drew his crossbow and split the apple without so much as brushing the boy.

The tyrant, Albrecht (or Hermann) Gessler, was impressed, but hauled Tell off anyway to spend his life in a dungeon. On the way, Tell made a daring escape, assissinated Gessler and went on to help lead a rebellion that eventually resulted in Switzerland.

Or so the legend goes.

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Saprissa equals longest winless streak in 35 years https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/12/saprissa-equals-longest-winless-streak-in-35-years Mon, 12 Apr 2021 06:45:52 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144053 Saprissa reached eight consecutive games without a win in the Clausura 2021 soccer tournament.

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Deportivo Saprissa drew 1-1 with Pérez Zeledón and reached eight consecutive games without a win in the Clausura 2021 soccer tournament in Costa Rica, equaling a club record established in 1986.

Despite the circumstances — and the fact that those led by World Cup player Roy Myers have gone nine games in a row without winning away, the worst mark in club history — Saprissa remains in the qualifying zone at the final phase of the tournament.

For the next date Saprissa will have a complicated test, when it receives the leader, Alajuelense, in another new edition of the Costa Rican classic.

Alajuelense thrashed Grecia at home, 4-1, and remains the only undefeated side of the tournament.

Saprissa and Alajuelense will also compete in the return leg of the CONCACAF Champions League Round of 16 this week. Both clubs trail, 1-0, to their Major League Soccer opponents.

Through 17 dates of the Clausura, Alajuelense sums 37 points; Santos 31; Saprissa and Herediano, 22; Jicaral and Limón, 21; Cartaginés and San Carlos, 20; Grecia and Sporting, 17; Guadalupe, 16; Pérez Zeledón, 15.

Matchday results:

Saprissa – Pérez Zeledón: 1-1

Greece – Alajuelense: 1-4

Guadalupe – Herediano: 2-2

Limón – Sporting: 3-1

Santos – Jicaral: 3-0

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Costa Rica relocation/retirement guide book releases its 19th edition https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/11/costa-rica-relocation-retirement-guide-book-releases-its-19th-edition Sun, 11 Apr 2021 23:03:48 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144034 Long time Costa Rica citizen and Tico Times columnist, Christopher Howard, releases the 19th edition of his popular relocation/retirement guide Over 40 years ago Christopher Howard made his maiden voyage to Costa Rica and it was love at first site. Have had lived and studied in Mexico, but his dream was to find his slice of […]

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Long time Costa Rica citizen and Tico Times columnist, Christopher Howard, releases the 19th edition of his popular relocation/retirement guide

Over 40 years ago Christopher Howard made his maiden voyage to Costa Rica and it was love at first site. Have had lived and studied in Mexico, but his dream was to find his slice of paradise in some other part of Latin America. It turned out that Costa Rica more than fit the bill.

He relocated here in 1980 and the rest is history. Within a couple of years he founded a successful language institute but his life took a 180 degree turn. In 1988 while reading an ad in a U.S. publication for a book about retiring in Mexico, it occurred to him that no such guide existed for Costa Rica.

So, he put together a short 100-page booklet about moving here. Slowly but surely and after 18 best-selling editions his guidebook book evolved and improved into what it is today.

Christopher just finished updating the new edition of the 788-page guidebook,  “The New Golden Door to Retirement and Living in Costa Rica — the official guide to relocation.” Like all of Howard’s other books about Latin America, this new edition is published by his company, Costa Rica Books S.A.

All of the nuts and bolts, time-tested advice, insider information and contacts are included to make the move relatively  seamlessly.

The book contains fourteen well-organized chapters which cover a variety of topics in detail: Costa Rica’s land and history, choosing where to live, saving money, making money, health care, starting a business, real estate, red tape, residency, staying busy and happy, communications, getting around, education (tips for learning Spanish and language schools), more useful information, parting thoughts and advice and resources.

In addition, there are anecdotes about expats experiences while living here and sidebars with practical tips.

A previous edition was featured on the cover of Publishers Weekly’s annual travel edition and was a candidate for the independent Publishers Group’s Benjamin Franklin Award for outstanding independent publishing.

As a result of his books popularity Christopher began to offer one-of-a-kind relocation/retirement tours to Costa Rica in the early 1990s. For details see: www.liveincostarica.com.

To purchase a copy of this new DIGITAL eBook see www.costaricabooks.com or soon on www.amazon.com in both kindle and hard cover formats.

 

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Costa Rica Multipurpose Patio Shrub – Malinche https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/11/multipurpose-malinche-an-attractive-and-useful-ornamental Sun, 11 Apr 2021 20:19:53 +0000 http://ticotimes.net/?p=112294 HOME GARDENING: Malinche makes a pretty shrub for the tropical garden while offering multiple medicinal uses.

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Here’s another attractive ornamental that’s a favorite Costa Rican backyard patio shrub. You’ll find malinche (Caesalpinia pulcherrima) growing in just about any barrio in the country.

Its unmistakable bright red or yellow flowers resemble those of the giant poinciana trees, and so it’s called dwarf poinciana in English. Other common names include Barbados fence flower and paradise flower. Costa Ricans call it hoja sen or clavelina.

Malinche is a native plant of Mesoamerica that is now found around the world in tropical regions. This hardy shrub-like tree grows to no more than three meters, but is usually pruned to maintain a compact shape for border hedges. The leaves are double-pinnate, and the stems usually have small thorns. The beautiful flowers bloom most of the year and attract hummingbirds and butterflies to the garden.

Leading nurseries often carry malinche, but you also can collect seeds from local plants or start cuttings. The seeds can be planted in recycled plastic cups with several holes punched in the bottom and filled with prepared potting soil.

It takes about two weeks for the seeds to germinate, and another month or two before the young plants are ready for transplanting to the garden, preferably in full-sun locations. Cuttings can be started in cups and take about the same time. Rooting preparations help stimulate root growth and speed up the process.

Malinche grows in poor soils but responds well to additions of organic compost fertilizer for better growth and flowering. As the plants reach about a meter tall, pinch the leading new growth of each stem to form a compact, bush-like shape.

Malinche is a hardy ornamental that has no serious insect problems or plant diseases, and it does not need watering in the dry season. These attributes place it high on the list of eco-friendly garden plants. And it has several other beneficial uses.

A small handful of the leaves can be used in an infusion of one cup of boiling water as a laxative and to reduce fevers, while the same amount of flowers in an infusion promotes menstruation.

The leaves can also be used as a maceration to treat insect bites and skin conditions, such as fungal and bacterial infections or rashes. The roots and seedpods produce a red dye, and the dried flowers soaked in water act as a natural insect repellent.

As you can see, malinche offers much more than attractive flowers around the home. It’s a multipurpose plant that has become a beloved friend to many a Costa Rican. Will you, too, invite this new friend into your garden?

Originally published on April 14, 2011.

Read more of Ed Bernhardt’s monthly Home Gardening columns here.

For more information on tropical gardening – naturally – and upcoming Sunday workshops, visit Ed’s website 

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Costa Rica celebrates Juan Santamaría Day https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/11/juan-santamaria-day-costa-rica-2021 Sun, 11 Apr 2021 19:55:13 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144038 Juan Santamaría Day commemorates the Costa Rican victory in the Battle of Rivas in 1856 against the U.S. citizen William Walker and his mercenary army.

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Costa Rica, lacking an army since 1948, has relatively few war heroes. Perhaps the most notable exception is Juan Santamaría, a poor drummer boy from Alajuela.

Celebrated every year on April 11, Juan Santamaría Day commemorates the Costa Rican victory in the Battle of Rivas in 1856 against the U.S. citizen William Walker and his mercenary army.

Sunday would typically be a day of celebration in Alajuela and across Costa Rica, but the coronavirus pandemic has hindered celebrations. 

“Today marks 165 years since we were called to face a challenge where we made history: the Battle of Rivas,” said President Carlos Alvarado, who participated in a small ceremony Sunday morning.

“On April 11, we commemorate that act of courage that demonstrated what we are capable of winning as a country. It is our turn at this particular moment to honor that fact by facing a new threat with hard work, union and above all with protection for the life and health of all.”

What was Walker doing here in the first place? What was mid-1800s life like in Costa Rica?

And what do we know about Santamaría himself? Check out the stories below for answers:

What is Juan Santamaría Day?

Who was Juan Santamaría? Five (debated) things you should know

Life in Juan Santamaría’s Costa Rica: A look back

If you want to learn more about Juan Santamaría and Costa Rican history, we recommend visiting Museo Histórico Cultural Juan Santamaría in downtown Alajuela or the National Museum of Costa Rica in San José once the pandemic passes. 

 

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A sloth for your Sunday https://ticotimes.net/2021/04/11/a-sloth-for-your-sunday-april-11 Sun, 11 Apr 2021 19:49:21 +0000 https://ticotimes.net/?p=144036 Happy Sunday from all of us at The Tico Times! 

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Happy Sunday from all of us at The Tico Times!

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