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Contras

Honduran president during US-funded ‘Contra’ war on Nicaragua dies

Roberto Suazo Cordova, president of Honduras during the US-financed "Contra" war against Nicaragua in the 1980s, died on Saturday, officials said.

Daniel Ortega willing to talk to Donald Trump

Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega said he’s willing to talk to U.S. President Donald Trump to address the crisis in Nicaragua, even though he condemns a US “military intervention.”

An honest assessment of President Monge: ‘neutrality, but not too much’

With the death of former President Luis Alberto Monge on Nov. 29, it was necessary to take a look back at our historical record...

‘Point West’: The story of Oliver North’s Costa Rican airstrip

In his new book "Point West: The Political History of the Guanacaste National Park Project," the former Minister of Environment and Energy under President Óscar Arias tells of Oliver North's airstrip in Guanacaste and the Arias administration's fight to turn it and the forest around it into a national park.

30 years since secret Contra airstrip discovered in Costa Rica

This month marks the 30th anniversary of “the damned airstrip” in Costa Rica that was being used by the U.S. to ship arms to the Nicaraguan Contras.

The undoing of Gary Webb and today’s news organizations

My impression of Gary Webb was that, in addition to being a novice to tumultuous Central American politics, he was dead set on his thesis that the Contras originated the crack cocaine epidemic in the United States.

Reviving the messenger: Gary Webb’s tale on film

Dark Alliance rattled a lot of cages – it led to a Congressional investigation, and ultimately a CIA Inspector General’s report, which would corroborate some of Webb’s findings. But the San Jose Mercury News’ scoop also shook up a lot of the newspaper world. The New York Times, L.A. Times, and The Washington Post all went after Gary Webb to tear down his credibility and that of the story.

The exposure of Eugene Hasenfus

On Sunday, Oct. 5, 1986, a young Sandinista soldier named José Fernando Canales Alemán sighted a Fairchild C-123K cargo plane in Nicaraguan airspace near the Costa Rican border. He fired a Russian-made shoulder mounted SAM-7 surface-to-air missile and brought down the plane. One man survived. His name was Eugene Hasenfus, and his subsequent capture by Sandinista forces led to the unraveling of a complex web now called “The Iran-Contra Affair.”

PHOTOS: Esquipulas II – 5 presidents who came together to choose their own path

On Aug. 7, 1987, five Central American presidents signed a peace accord known as Esquipulas II, named after the city in Guatemala where the first round of meetings had taken place the previous year. The accord included a number of provisions for cooperation between the five countries, and most notably, it called for an end to support for “irregular forces” by all of the signatories.

Is the sword still the enemy of freedom?

The controversy this week over the nonexistent U.S. military base in Costa Rica brings to mind the year 1985, when U.S. Green Berets were training Costa Rican “policemen” in Murciélago, just north of the Santa Rose Peninsula in Guanacaste.

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