• Tico Travel Surfing
  • Squaremouth travel insurance button 468x106
  • Costa Rica Real Estate
  • Costa Rica Coffee Guide

Why do snakebites harm humans? Costa Rican scientists investigate

September 10, 2014

Human muscle tissue can bounce back from almost any type of wound, but venomous snakes can inflict bites that eat away flesh and even kill their victims. Though scientists have developed anti-venom serums to fight off a snakebite infection, they have yet to pinpoint the exact reason that bites cause such extensive tissue damage.

To find out, three experts from the University of Costa Rica’s snake bite research center – the Clodomiro Picado Institute – are examining exactly what makes a snakebite bite.

“In particular we are looking at what starts to happen to muscle tissue immediately after it is exposed to venom that impedes its regeneration,” said Dr. José María Gutiérrez, one of the project’s researchers. “Muscle tissue is built to sustain harm and normally has the ability to regenerate.”

To conduct their experiments, researchers inject venom into rats and muscle cells in the lab and note the immediate reaction in the muscle tissue.

Scientists found that venom damages blood vessels, which provide cells with the oxygen needed to recuperate, and nerve endings, which enable healthy muscles to contract. The most severe damage is caused by small traces of venom that persist in the tissue cells even as the body attempts to clear them out.

These tiny venom remnants are nearly undetectable and can stick to muscle tissue for up to five days after the initial bite. The remaining venom continues to degenerate the muscle until it disappears entirely. Researchers found that over the course of a month, this venom can reduce muscle tissue by up to 60 percent.

The new findings are helping investigators devise new treatments for snakebites that could help reduce scarring and muscle damage. So far, researchers have found little success in formulas to increase vessel growth, but they have seen some muscle regeneration with the use of certain antibiotics.

 

 

You may be interested

Costa Rica extends coronavirus travel restrictions through April 30
Costa Rica
10885 views
Costa Rica
10885 views

Costa Rica extends coronavirus travel restrictions through April 30

Alejandro Zúñiga - April 6, 2020

Costa Rica has extended its entry restrictions in response to the coronavirus pandemic until April 30. Through at least the…

Costa Rica ‘has not had an intense increase in cases,’ Health Ministry says
Costa Rica
9968 views
Costa Rica
9968 views

Costa Rica ‘has not had an intense increase in cases,’ Health Ministry says

Alejandro Zúñiga - April 6, 2020

Costa Rica has confirmed 467 total cases of the novel coronavirus, the Health Ministry announced Monday afternoon. The figure marks…

Costa Rica studies international response to Nicaraguan coronavirus inaction
Central America
177 views
Central America
177 views

Costa Rica studies international response to Nicaraguan coronavirus inaction

AFP and The Tico Times - April 6, 2020

Costa Rica is studying international actions to monitor Nicaragua's response to the novel coronavirus, as the government has not ordered…

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!