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A Costa Rica Expat’s View on Driving in Costa Rica

Are you tired of driving on smooth, well-maintained roads with clear signage and courteous drivers? Are you looking for a truly thrilling driving experience? Look no further than Costa Rica, where driving is an adventure in and of itself!

First of all, let’s talk about the roads. Potholes, gravel, and uneven pavement are just the beginning. In Costa Rica, you’ll also have to navigate around livestock, bicycles, and pedestrians on the roads, because why not? And don’t even think about using GPS, because the chances of it being accurate are about as good as winning the lottery.

But the real fun begins when you encounter other drivers. In Costa Rica, traffic laws are more like suggestions and drivers are known for their reckless and unpredictable behavior. Tailgating, sudden lane changes, and ignoring traffic signals are just part of the daily driving experience here. You’ll also have to contend with the infamous “pare y siga” or “stop and go” system, where drivers will just randomly stop in the middle of the road for no apparent reason, just for the fun of it.

And let’s not forget about the buses! These massive beasts of the road have a tendency to disregard traffic laws and take up multiple lanes, leaving you to wonder if you’ll ever see your family again.

But don’t worry, the excitement doesn’t end when you reach your destination. Finding a parking spot in Costa Rica is like playing a game of Tetris, where you have to maneuver your car into the tiniest of spaces while avoiding getting hit by other vehicles.

So if you’re looking for a truly one-of-a-kind driving experience, Costa Rica is the place for you. Buckle up and hold on tight, because it’s sure to be a wild ride!

Please note that this is a sarcastic article and it’s not meant to be taken seriously. Costa Rica has laws and regulations that apply to the traffic, and all the drivers are expected to follow them. The country also has a National Road Safety Council (CONASET) that works to improve the safety on the roads.

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