Cielo Vista

Don’t pass on a chance of a fish to crow about

June 4, 2018

Most visiting anglers come to this country with either marlin, sailfish, or tarpon on their bucket list. These are all spectacular fish and great angling challenges, available almost any day of the year – but they are not always around in great numbers, or they at times pass through periods when they are just not going to eat. Another drawback is that some anglers just can’t handle the open ocean, and a day being seasick is not going to be the highlight of your vacation.

Fortunately, there is an inshore fishery here that has quite a plethora of species. One can only be called sexy, like a sleek race car: The roosterfish should be on every visiting angler’s bucket list. They are strong, fast, painted in a brilliant hue, with a spoiler on top. They usually haunt the coastal waters which are generally calm, especially in the morning. They readily devour a live bait, and will take an artificial like a jig, lure, or a popper. They absolutely drive fly fisherman nuts for their reluctance to hit a fly. The angler that figures out the “Holy Grail” – the secret of taking a roosterfish on the fly – will forever be considered a legend in fishing circles.

Diego Torian with big roosterfish. Courtesy of Todd Staley

The Golfo Dulce in southern Costa Rica offers a vast area to fish for roosters. Las Islas Lodge, Zancudo Lodge, Crocodile Bay Resort and private charters in Golfito and Puerto Jiménez all specialize in catching roosterfish among the offshore species they are all famous for. Except when the afternoon sea breeze kicks in, the gulf is generally like a big lake.

While all these places specialize in roosterfish, Oscar Villalobos specializes in trophy roosterfish. Diego Torian, host of Pescando de los Cayos television, who is filming a yearlong series on fishing locations in Costa Rica, had only one day to test the waters in Golfo Dulce after filming an episode with Pablo Chaves from Rio Sierpe. Torian hosts the only Spanish-language fishing show in the United States.

A roosterfish swirls on a bait. Courtesy of Bryan Johnson

“Your average client doesn’t have the patience to fish big roosters,” said Villalobos. “Sometimes the hardest part is catching the right bait that big roosters like. But once you do, the big ones are usually there.”

He prefers bonitos, skip jacks, and small yellowfin tuna to use as live bait and insists a five-pound bait is not too big. When he gets his bait he places it on the same size circle hook he uses for marlin. He says a roosterfish can swallow a bait up to 20% of its weight. This day was exceptionally slow to get the bait he wanted and after four hours he had only one medium-sized bonito.

As his search went on, he decided to put his lone bait out near a rock outcropping. Within five minutes, the rod tip bounced, then bent downwards and line started flying off the reel. Torian let the fish run, giving it time to turn the bait in his mouth, and the locked the reel in gear. Line continued to scream off the reel but now against the brake of the reel. Like most roosterfish, this one made numerous short runs and took back the line Torian had gained several times. Eventually the fish tired and checked in at just over fifty pounds before being released.

Roosters often cruise with dorsal above surface. Courtesy of Todd Staley

Luckily, getting more bait was not as difficult. In less than a half hour in, he had four more nice baits in his tuna tubes to keep them healthy. Every one of the baits got hit near the same rock and one more roosterfish came to the boat at 65 lbs and was released. The other baits were lost on missed fish or stolen by snapper leaving big teeth marks in the part of the bait that remained. Two big roosterfish on a spinning rod made great film and their mission was complete.

Villalobos is owner of Los Isla Lodge and captains one of their boats. More information at www.lasislaslodge.com.

Todd Staley has run fishing sport operations on both coasts of Costa Rica for over 25 years. He recently decided to take some time off to devote full time to marine conservation. His “Wetline Costa Rica” column appears monthly in The Tico Times. Contact him at wetline@hotmail.com.

Facebook Comments

You may be interested

Venezuelan embassy reopens in Costa Rica
News
9 views
News
9 views

Venezuelan embassy reopens in Costa Rica

Alejandro Zúñiga - May 21, 2019

María Faria, the Venezuelan Ambassador to Costa Rica, announced this week that the South American country's embassy in San José…

IACHR mission visits Costa Rica to evaluate protections for indigenous communities
Costa Rica
17 views
Costa Rica
17 views

IACHR mission visits Costa Rica to evaluate protections for indigenous communities

AFP and The Tico Times - May 21, 2019

Representatives of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) began on Monday a visit to Costa Rica to supervise protection…

Fishing for the next generation in Quepos
Sponsored content
23 views
Sponsored content
23 views

Fishing for the next generation in Quepos

Scott Cutter / Marina Pez Vela - May 20, 2019

Having completed the 20th edition of the Offshore World Championship in May, and the 7th edition of this iconic event…

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!